Posts Tagged ‘foot pain’

Morton’s Neuroma, a Painful Foot Condition

Foot Pain From Morton’s Neuroma

Morton’s neuroma is a medical condition that affects the nerve in between the third and fourth toes. However, it only usually affects one foot.

The Causes of Morton’s Neuroma

Morton’s neuroma develops when the nerve between the third and fourth toes becomes crushed and / or irritated. The suspected cause of the irritation is wearing shoes that are too narrow. When the small bones of the foot press up against the nerve they cause the nerve and its surrounding tissues to become increasingly thick. Some foot care specialists believe that other foot conditions, including bunions and high foot arches, play a role in the development of Morton’s neuroma.

Anyone of any age can develop Morton’s neuroma. However, the condition commonly affects women. In particular, it tends to develop in women who regularly wear high-heeled footwear, those who partake in regular exercise and those with high arched feet.

The Symptoms of Morton’s Neuroma

Morton’s neuroma causes a tingling sensation at the base of toes or in the ball of the foot. Over time, this sensation may worsen, leading to cramping in the toes and shooting pains in the foot. The pain is likely to be at its worst when an affected individual tries to walk and / or wears shoes that fail to provide their feet with an appropriate level of support. In some people with Morton’s neuroma, the pain is so bad that they try to avoid placing their affected foot on the ground.

Anyone experiencing tingling sensations or pain in their feet should consult with a trained podiatrist, an individual who specializes in foot problems. A podiatrist may examine the affected foot and determine the severity and type of any pain felt, the duration of the symptoms experienced, the type of footwear worn and any work or leisure activities that have been carried out. An X-ray, MRI scan or ultrasound scan may be taken so that the structures inside of the foot can be viewed.

Non Invasive Treatment of Morton’s Neuroma

Individuals with Morton’s neuroma are strongly advised to wear appropriate footwear. The pain of this condition is likely to be of greater intensity when an individual wears tight or otherwise ill-fitting shoes. Wearing shoes with a wider toe-box can aid in lessening the pain of this condition by providing more room for the toes and prevent rubbing of the feet. High-heeled shoes are likely to worsen the pain of Morton’s neuroma. Shoes with heels over 5 cm in height and those with pointed toes should therefore be avoided at all costs.

Engaging in exercise can worsen the symptoms of Morton’s neuroma. This is particularly true of sports that involve running. Individuals with Morton’s neuroma may therefore be advised to try sports that don’t place considerable pressure on their feet.

It has been our experience that providing appropriate metetarsal support, like the Birkenstock Blue Footbed, may help to alleviate the symptoms. We also recommend the Kenkoh Health Massage Sandal to ease the stress in your feet and help to restore normal function to the affected area.

 

Neuromas Really Hurt

Happy Feet Plus - Neuromas Really Hurt

Does the bottom of your foot tingle, burn or feel numb?

If you have one or more of these symptoms you might be suffering from Morton’s Neuroma:

  • Tingling, burning, or numbness
  • Pain
  • A feeling that something is inside the ball of your foot
  • A feeling that your sock is bunched up

So, what is a neuroma?

A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissues and may occur in almost any part of the body. This thickening, or enlargement, is the result of compression and irritation of the nerve. This compression creates enlargement of the nerve, eventually leading to permanent nerve damage.

Morton’s Neuroma is the most common foot neuroma. Morton’s Neuroma develops between the third and fourth toes. In this area of the foot part of the lateral plantar nerve combines with part of the medial plantar nerve. Where these two nerves merge they are usually larger in diameter than those going to the other toes. Also contributing to potential problems, the nerve lies close to the surface of the skin and to an artery and vein.

As a result, even a small amount of squeezing or irritation of the nerve can lead to the development of a neuroma. Pointy-toed shoes or high-heeled shoes are typically the cause of irritation.

People with bunions, hammer toes, or flat feet are more likely to develop a neuroma.

Once the pain starts, what should I expect?

  • At first you may only feel the discomfort when wearing certain pointy-toed shoes or doing some activity that aggravates the affected area.
  • The symptoms might go away when you remove the shoe or massage the foot.
  • Over time the symptoms worsen and may continue for several days or weeks.
  • The symptoms will become more intense as the neuroma enlarges and the temporary changes in the nerve become permanent.

What can I do to lessen or eliminate the pain?

  • The first thing to do is to stop wearing the pointy-toed and high-heeled shoes.
  • Reduce or stop any activities that place repetitive pressure on the nerve.
  • Begin wearing supportive footwear with a wide toe box like Birkenstock or Finn Comfort, or use high-quality shoe inserts such as the Birkenstock or Birki insoles.
  • Place an icepack on the affected area to help reduce swelling.

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Regards,

Dave